Planning in Public: tackling the Curation Game

Tomorrow we are launching our first public consultation event looking at ways of reinvigorating the ceramics displays on the balcony above the Industrial Gallery.

Two years ago we overhauled the Industrial Gallery displays and instead of showing separate cases of glass and ceramics as we had done previously we grouped the objects into mixed media displays exploring subjects such as the natural world and the human image.

The Industrial Gallery

Now it is the turn of gallery upstairs. At the moment we have a very object-rich display which looks at the development of European ceramics from the 17th century onwards. It is a great resource if you want to get your head around the difference between a piece made in Lowestoft or Liverpool or see a selection of de Morgan tiles and Ruskin pottery. But these displays were originally put together in the 1980s and now their time in the spotlight is coming around again.

We want to find out what our visitors would like to see in a new ceramics display. We could ask questions but we thought it would be much more fun (and we hope much more productive), to invite people to have a go at arranging their own display. And that’s what the Curation Game is all about. We’re not using actual museum objects, so no need for gloves, but visitors will be able to make a 3D mock up of a case using images of the objects from the collections.

I don’t want to give away too much, or perish the thought, put ideas into people’s heads but I can guarantee there’s lots of opportunity for you to have your say in how you would like to see the new gallery displays develop, and, as we are doing this in the Industrial Gallery, there’s also the chance to pop upstairs and see the current displays, too.

Would any of these objects feature in your display?

The Curation Game

Come along to one of the sessions in the Industrial Gallery and play the Curation Game:

  • Wednesday 13th March   1-4pm
  • Tuesday 19th March   11-3pm
  • Sunday 24th March   1-4pm

Sylvia Crawley
Curator (Applied Art)

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